Preposition – About after nouns

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  1. Anxiety
  2. argument
  3. assumption
  4. complaint
  5. concern
  6. debate
  7. discussion
  8. doubt
  9. enquiry
  10. feeling
  11. fuss
  12. information
  13. joke
  14. news
  15. point
  16. question
  17. reservation
  18. speculation
  19. statement
  20. story
  21. talk
  22. uncertainty
  23. worry

Brought to you by

Bryan

(An essayist)

012-664-1376

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Common Errors – Between

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  1. Between you and me, you don’t listen to other strangers who are attempting to hoax you.
  2. I think you have to let Bryan and me play on the basketball court or your team will be defeated soon.

Regards,

(An Essay Trainer with an array of English Writing Skills)

If you are eager to find out why, please feel free to contact Bryan at 012-664-1376

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Common Errors – At or In?

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Do you know when do you use either “In” or “At”?

Example: –

  1. Trainer Bryan lives in Australia.
  2. Trainer Bryan’s car is in Malaysia.
  3. Trainer Bryan dwells at the small coastal village located just only stone’s throw away.

Regards,

Bryan

(Trainer and Founder of Mastertuition)

For further clarification and explanation, kindly contact Bryan, the Essay Trainer, at 012-664-1376.

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Preposition – About

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How do you use “ABOUT” effectively?

  1. I am not sure about the news.
  2. Teacher Bryan is very anxious about the results of two of his students.
  3. We have just started making enquiries about him.
  4. I have already told you what I feel about the appointment.

**A less frequent use is as a synonym of round or around: –

Example: The dog was running about the garden all day.

**About can be contrasted with on, which focuses on more specific and detailed content: –

Examples:

  1. He gave a lecture about Bryan Low.
  2. She gave a lecture on the position of English adverbs in spoken language.

Regards,

Bryan Low

(The Trainer and Founder of Mastertuition)

 

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The Present Perfect- Just, already, yet; for and since

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  1. Bryan has just come back from his vacation.
  2. Bryan has just had a fabulous idea for writing a perfect essay.
  3. It isn’t an extraordinary party. Most participants have already gone for teacher Bryan’s writing class.
  4. Bryan has already taught more than 1000 students.
  5. It’s eleven o’clock and many students have not left Bryan’s class yet.
  6. Has your writing programme started yet?
  7. Bryan has only had that new phone for three days.
  8. Those avid learners have been at Mastertution since 8 o’clock in the morning.
  9. I’ve felt excited for a whole week now.
  10. I haven’t learned the techniques of writing with Bryan for more than 10 years.

Bryan

The Trainer and Founder of Mastertuition

(The Trainer for Essay Writing)

012-664-1376